Mango Habanero Hot Sauce

This years CSA brought a bumper-crop of hot peppers our way. Even with bad drought conditions here in Hew Hampshire, we still managed to score more peppers than we could ever eat in one sitting. This is just a small amount of what we ended up with, but look at all those awesome colors!

Loads of beautiful hot peppers!
Hot pepper assortment; habanero, fresno and ghost chilies!!!

Since this is a blog that focuses primarily on preserving the seasons, I could just assume some of our loyal readers came here to check out this awesome recipe.

I’m a huge fan of hot sauce, as most people who love food are. We put our favorite hot sauces on about everything. Yes, there are the old faithful standbys sriracha and sambal oelek sitting in the fridge at-the-ready. But, you know, there is nothing quite as delicious and rewarding as, not only, hand-picking your own hot peppers, but creating something from it that you can be proud of. Something that you watched become a condiment. It’s like mother-natures best reward as a chef and foodie every time you drizzle it on your eggs or something.

Not only are hot sauces delicious and easy to make, but according to some recent research, hot peppers and hot sauce are among the healthiest foods on the planet.

As you may know, there are thousands of types of hot peppers, and they tend to offer similar nutritional benefits. A half-cup serving of green chili peppers, for example, is low in calories, sugars and carbohydrates. It also contains little fat and no cholesterol as well as loads of Vitamin C.

Not only are hot peppers a guilt-free food (if you’re into labeling your foods on the basis of it’s level of guilt) hot chili peppers contain flavonoids, antioxidants, lots of vitamins and minerals, all of which confer health benefits, including anti-aging and anti-inflammatory properties, DNA protection and lower blood pressure. Check out the rest of this interesting article here.

With respect to the craft of preservation and the love of fresh local food, I came up with this recipe to, not only, celebrate this amazing fruit, but to offer complex level of flavors. Not to mention its really pretty too.

Check out the recipe below and we encourage feedback. Thanks for reading!

Print Recipe
Hot Sauce
I also did a version where I replaced the mangoes with apples with great results! Give it a try.
Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 20 Minutes
Passive Time 1.5 Hours
Servings
4 ounce jars
Ingredients
Prep Time 30 Minutes
Cook Time 20 Minutes
Passive Time 1.5 Hours
Servings
4 ounce jars
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Using gloves (don't be a hero!), de-stem, core and de-seed your hot peppers. Of course, if you want to increase your level of heat, feel free to keep the seeds in.
  2. If you have a burner on your gas grill or access to a portable butane burner, it's a good idea to do this outside. At the very least, open a couple windows as the capsaicin in the chilies will make you (and everyone around you) cough and sneeze! Char the peppers in a dry cast iron skillet until the peppers are slightly blistered with nice color around the edges.
  3. Meanwhile, give your bell peppers, onion and garlic cloves a good char on the grill or under your broiler in your oven. Of course, slice your onion, de-seed and core your bell peppers and keep the skins on your garlic, you can peel that off later.
  4. Again, it's a good idea to do this outside or open a couple windows during this step. Cover your charred items with your vinegar and add your salt. Simmer for about 10-15 minutes or until the peppers are soft, do not over cook your peppers as this will effect the final color.
  5. Once your peppers are tender, add the mangoes (or peeled and cored apples), cilantro and honey and bring everything up to a simmer for about 3 minutes, just to heat things up a bit.
  6. Carefully ladel all the contents into a blender. Don't over-fill it as you will have a (literal) hot mess all over you and the kitchen! If you have a blender that has variable speeds, slap the lid on tightly and start off pureeing your contents on low. You can slowly turn up the speed and let it go for about 2 minutes or until everything is perfectly smooth. I had to do this in multiple batches because this recipe makes quite a bit.
  7. After you've given your items a good whir, strain it into a large soup pot (This will remove any fibers that may have been left behind and ensure a nice smooth sauce), preferably with a heavy bottom, and bring your hot sauce up to a simmer. Meanwhile, get your canning stuff ready according to your canning manufacturers suggestions.
  8. For me, I used the boiling water bath canning process for 10 minutes. I then carefully pulled them out onto a towel and let them cool overnight. I had to check the lids just to make sure the jars sealed correctly, which they did.
  9. I got about 20 4 ounce jars out of this batch.
  10. The next morning, slap a label on each jar and store for about a year. Of course, we like to give these out to friends and family, but we eat most of it!
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