Pickled Hot Peppers

Yes, we love our hot peppers. Personally, my favorite way to enjoy hot peppers is in sauce form, however, there’s nothing like a nice hot pickle-y bite of jalapeno layered on top of your burger, in a quesadilla or sprinkled on top of a pile of nachos. Honestly, until I tried a side-by-side comparison of my pickled hot peppers up against a “leading store brand” I was convinced that the best way to enjoy one is to make my own.

Sources say, that the origin of chilies is believed to be as old as 7000 B.C. used in Mexico. Chilies were grown and cultivated from 3500 BC. Mexicans used it to spice up their food. Chili was brought to the rest of the world by Christopher Columbus who discovered America in 1493. (chilly.in, 2017) So, to say they’ve been around for a while is an understatement. The peppers we pick from our local CSA fly out of the ground in record numbers. Every week we went by to grab our produce, we acquired another pound or two! As you have already seen by this blog, I have found many ways to preserve the pepper season.

Assorted hot peppers, fresh picked that morning

There are a couple reasons I love to use the pickling method to preserve a few of our glut of these spicy little suckers. You can’t imagine an easier pickle and, well, its cheap. A little salt, a lot of white vinegar and maybe a clove of garlic or two and you’re done. You can do one jar and toss them in the fridge, or you can fill up a few dozen canning jars and store them in your pantry for a few months.

Of course, researching for this blog post, I found that the Jalapeno we know and love originated in Veracruz, Mexico. We, generally, pick them when they are green, but they can ripen to red or yellow. We shouldn’t confuse the jalapeno, however, with the red Fresno chilies, which are a little hotter. When they grow, they grow point up instead of point down like the jalapeno. Either way, if you have these in your garden or find a bunch at your local farmers market, this pickling method will work.

The only thing I came across was the issue with texture. My first batch came out a little too soft for my liking. The hot vinegar cooked the peppers to a soft stage. I combated that by adding a little pickle crisp to each jar of the next round and that pretty much solved my issue. Either way, the flavors are amazing and fresh.

Another great thing about pickling hot peppers is that we can eat them all year round in all sorts of things. Of course, we toss them on top of quesadillas, inside tacos and wrapped within fat burritos. The liquid is awesome inside vinaigrette’s, slaw and cocktails, believe it or not.

Check out this simple recipe. You can substitute any number of different peppers, hot or sweet, this simple pickle will kick start your preservation hobby.

 

Print Recipe
Pickled Hot Peppers
A great way to preserve a handful or a sack full of your favorite chilies!
Prep Time 1-2 Hours
Servings
Pints
Ingredients
Prep Time 1-2 Hours
Servings
Pints
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Wash and prepare peppers. Remember, the above is just a guide, feel free to mix any other peppers into the mix, as long as the result is approximately 11 cups of peppers. In a large stainless steel pot, combine vinegar, water and garlic. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat and boil gently for 5 minutes until garlic has infused the liquid. Discard garlic.
  2. If canning, prepare canning jars and lids according to manufacturers instructions. You, basically, want to wash and sanitize them. Fill each jar with the mix of hot pepper rings, leaving about an inch of space from the top. Pour hot liquid over peppers . I like to use one of those canning funnels that you find at your favorite box store. This makes it a little easier and a lot neater. Be sure to use the handle of a wooden spoon to get in there and remove any air bubbles that may have been trapped within the chili rings. This will ensure a safe canning technique. If you need to, you can add a little more liquid over the rings after you remove the air bubbles. Just make sure you leave at least 1/2 inch head space.
  3. Clean the tops of your jars (in case there was any spillage) then place the lids and rings on top. Carefully screw them down and finger tighten to a decent resistance. Place the jars in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes. That's 10 minutes after your boil comes back, very important.
  4. Pull the jars out with a rubber-covered canning tongs and place on a thick, dry towel on the counter. Allow the jars to cool and mind their business over night. You may hear a little popping, tinny sounds now and again, that's a goo thing. This means that the canning process went as planned. Your jars can now be labeled with the date and content name and placed on your pantry shelf. For best results, wait at least a week before eating to let them become pickled. I find that waiting over 2 weeks is even better.
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Private: Pickled Hot Peppers

This recipe makes approximately 5 pint jars of pickled hot peppers. Even though three different peppers are listed below, you can swap out any sort of chili your heart desires. Just keep in mind that all peppers have different levels of heat so do your research if you are not sure.

A couple important tips before we move forward:

  1. Always wear rubber gloves when working with chilies. Getting the juice on your eye…or some other sensitive area could mean bad news.
  2. If you want to knock down a little of the heat, feel free to remove the seeds. We won’t judge!
Print Recipe
Pickled Hot Peppers
A great way to preserve a handful or a sack full of your favorite chilies!
Prep Time 1-2 Hours
Servings
Pints
Ingredients
Prep Time 1-2 Hours
Servings
Pints
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Wash and prepare peppers. Remember, the above is just a guide, feel free to mix any other peppers into the mix, as long as the result is approximately 11 cups of peppers. In a large stainless steel pot, combine vinegar, water and garlic. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat and boil gently for 5 minutes until garlic has infused the liquid. Discard garlic.
  2. If canning, prepare canning jars and lids according to manufacturers instructions. You, basically, want to wash and sanitize them. Fill each jar with the mix of hot pepper rings, leaving about an inch of space from the top. Pour hot liquid over peppers . I like to use one of those canning funnels that you find at your favorite box store. This makes it a little easier and a lot neater. Be sure to use the handle of a wooden spoon to get in there and remove any air bubbles that may have been trapped within the chili rings. This will ensure a safe canning technique. If you need to, you can add a little more liquid over the rings after you remove the air bubbles. Just make sure you leave at least 1/2 inch head space.
  3. Clean the tops of your jars (in case there was any spillage) then place the lids and rings on top. Carefully screw them down and finger tighten to a decent resistance. Place the jars in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes. That's 10 minutes after your boil comes back, very important.
  4. Pull the jars out with a rubber-covered canning tongs and place on a thick, dry towel on the counter. Allow the jars to cool and mind their business over night. You may hear a little popping, tinny sounds now and again, that's a goo thing. This means that the canning process went as planned. Your jars can now be labeled with the date and content name and placed on your pantry shelf. For best results, wait at least a week before eating to let them become pickled. I find that waiting over 2 weeks is even better.
Share this Recipe

Leave a Comment